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Getting Married in the Republic of Ireland

Information on the Legal Requirements for an Irish Wedding

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So you want to get married in Ireland? Generally speaking this is no big problem, but you should be aware of the legal requirements to have a legally recognized wedding in the Republic of Ireland (another article will give you details on weddings in Northern Ireland). Here are the basics:

General Requirements for Marriage in the Republic of Ireland

First and foremost, you must be at least 18 years old to get married - though there are some exceptions to this rule. In addition, you will be tested as to whether you have "the capacity to marry". Apart from not being already married (bigamy is illegal) you must freely consent to marriage and understand what marriage means.

The latter two requirements have recently come under closer scrutiny by the authorities and a bride or groom not being able to reasonably communicate in English may find it difficult to get through the ceremony, at least in the registrar's office. A registrar may also refuse to complete the ceremony if s/he has any doubt that the union is voluntary or believes that a "sham" wedding to circumvent immigration laws is taking place.

Irish Notification Requirements for a Marriage

Since November 5th, 2007, anyone marrying in the Republic of Ireland must have given at least three months notification. This notification must generally be made in person to any registrar.

Take note that this applies to all marriages, those solemnised by a registrar or according to religious rites and ceremonies. So even for a full church wedding you will have to contact a registrar beforehand. This registrar does not have to be the registrar for the district where you intend to get married (e.g. you can leave notification in Dublin and get married in Kerry).

Up to a few years ago you would have to appear in person - this has changed. If either bride or groom are living abroad, you may contact a registrar and request permission to complete the notification by post. Should permission be granted (it generally is), the registrar will then send out a form to be completed and returned. Note that all this adds several days to the notification process ... so start corresponding as early as possible. A notification fee of € 150 will also need to be paid.

And bride and groom will still be obliged to make arrangements for meeting the registrar in person at least five days the wedding day - only then can a Marriage Registration Form be issued.

Legal Documentation Needed

When you start corresponding with the registrar you should be informed about all information and documents you need to supply. The following will generally be demanded:

  • Passports as identification;
  • Birth certificates (with an "apostille stamp" if not issued in Ireland);
  • Original final divorce decree(s) if one or both are divorcees, in case of a non-Irish divorce an approved English translation of the divorce decree will be required;
  • Original dissolutions of all previous civil partnerships (if applicable, again in translation if needed);
  • Final decree of nullity and a letter from the relevant court confirming that no appeal was lodged (if a civil partnership or marriage was annulled by an Irish Court);
  • Deceased spouse's death certificate and previous civil marriage certificate in case of widowhood;
  • PPS Numbers (not applicable to non-residents in most cases).

Further Information Needed by the Registrar

To issue a Marriage Registration Form, the registrar will also ask for further information about the planned marriage. This will include:

  • Decision on a civil or religious ceremony;
  • Intended date and location of the ceremony;
  • Details of the proposed solemniser of the marriage;
  • Names and dates of birth of two proposed witnesses;

Declaration of No Impediment

In addition to all the paperwork above, when meeting the registrar both partners are required to sign a declaration that they know of no lawful impediment to the proposed marriage.

Marriage Registration Form

A Marriage Registration Form (in short MRF) is the final "Irish marriage licence", giving official authorisation for a couple to marry. Without this you simply can't get legally married in Ireland. Providing there is no impediment to the marriage and all documentation is in order, the MRF will be issued fairly swiftly.

The actual wedding should follow swiftly as well - the MRF is good for six months of the proposed date of marriage given on the form. If this time frame runs out, a new MRF is required (meaning jumping through all the bureaucratic hoops again).

Actual Ways to Get Married

Today, there are several different (and legal) ways of getting married in the Republic of Ireland. Couples may opt for a religious ceremony or choose a civil ceremony. The registration process (see above) still stays the same - no religious ceremony is legally binding without a prior civil registration and a MRF (which needs to be handed to the solemniser, completed by him/her and given back to a registrar within one month of the ceremony).

Couples may opt for marriage by religious ceremony (in an "appropriate venue") or by civil ceremony, the latter may take place either in a registry office or at another approved place. Whatever the option - all are equally valid and binding under Irish law. If a couple decides to marry in a religious ceremony, the religious requirements should be discussed well beforehand with the celebrant of the marriage.

Who Can Marry a Couple, Who is a "Solemniser"?

Since November 2007, the General Register Office has started to keep the "Register of Solemnisers of Marriage" - anyone solemnising a civil or religious marriage must be on this register. If he or she is not, the marriage is not legally valid. The register can be inspected at any registration office or online at www.groireland.ie.

The register currently names nearly 6.000 solemnisers, the majority from the established Christian churches (Roman-Catholic, Church of Ireland and the Presbyterian Church), but including smaller Christian churches as well as the Orthodox church, the Jewish faith, Baha'i, Buddhist and Islamic solemnisers.

Renewing Vows?

Not possible - under Irish law, anybody who already is married cannot get married again ... even to the same person. Effectively it is impossible (and illegal) to renew wedding vows in a civil or church ceremony in Ireland.

Church Blessings

There is a tradition of non-legal "church blessings" in Ireland - Irish couples who married abroad tended to hold a religious ceremony at home later. Also couples may choose have their marriage blessed in a religious ceremony on special anniversaries. This might be an alternative to a full Irish wedding ...

More Information Needed?

Should you need more information, citizensinformation.ie is the best place to go to ...

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